Saturday, August 13, 2016

When to Use “Like” vs. “Such As”

By editor Barbara McNichol, Guest Blogger

Editor Barbara McNichol is providing some tips to help you write like a pro.

Have you ever wondered about the distinction between “like” or “such as” in your writing. Here are two phrases to consider:

. . . the answers that so-called geniuses like / such as Newton seem to embody.

. . . centuries of innovations like / such as the airplane and the space shuttle have resulted.

In these examples, “such as” is preferred over “like” because the word “like” implies comparison while “such as” implies inclusion. That means being like something doesn’t include the thing itself.

In the first phrase, Newton is intended to be included as a so-called genius, so “such as” is the correct choice. In the second phrase, the airplane and space shuttle are examples of innovations meant to be included within this context. In contrast, the sentence “he’s like a fish swimming upstream” provides a clear comparison.

Your challenge: When you’re about to write “like,” ask this question: Would I include this point in a list or exclude it? The answer becomes your clue to select either “like” (exclude) or “such as” (include).

Today’s Word Tripper:

Adopt, adapt – “Adopt” means to take as one’s own as in someone else’s child, to choose something such as a lifestyle, or to formally accept something such as a position or principle. “Adapt” means to adjust to various conditions. “When you adopt a young girl, be sure to make it easy for her to adapt to your living environment.” 

Barbara McNichol is passionate about helping business professionals add power to their pen. To assist in this mission, she has created a Word Trippers Tips program with details at http://bit.ly/WrdTrippers.


Do you know when to use “Like” vs “Such As”? Check out this Word Tripper. (ClickToTweet)

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